Liver (food)

Slice of pig's liver and onions
Liver
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy561 kJ (134 kcal)
2.5 g
3.7 g
21 g
VitaminsQuantity
%DV
Vitamin A equiv.
813%
6500 μg
Riboflavin (B2)
250%
3 mg
Niacin (B3)
100%
15 mg
Vitamin B6
54%
0.7 mg
Folate (B9)
53%
212 μg
Vitamin B12
1083%
26 μg
Vitamin C
28%
23 mg
MineralsQuantity
%DV
Iron
177%
23 mg
Sodium
6%
87 mg

Calf liver and chicken liver are comparable.
Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA FoodData Central
Mămăligă (cornmeal mush) with chicken liver, cuisine of Moldova
Canned cod liver (see also: cod liver oil)

The liver of mammals, fowl, and fish is commonly eaten as food by humans (see offal). Pork, lamb, veal, beef, chicken, goose, and cod livers are widely available from butchers and supermarkets while stingray and burbot livers are common in some European countries. Animal livers are rich in iron, copper, the B vitamins and preformed vitamin A. It is unsure if daily consumption of liver can be harmful, as no conclusive research has been done on the toxicity of preformed vitamin A from food. A single serving of beef liver exceeds the tolerable upper intake level of vitamin A.[1] 100 g cod liver contains 5 mg of vitamin A and 100 µg of vitamin D.[2]

  1. ^ "Vitamin A". oregonstate.edu. Linus Pauling Institute. 22 April 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  2. ^ Nährstoffe und Vitamine in Dorschleber Deutsches Ernährungsberatungs- und -informationsnetz (in German)